Tomorrow is the 18th anniversary of 9/11. A solemn time to remember the tragedy, the lives lost and devastated, and where we were on the morning of attacks on our country. I vividly remember taking my usual morning walk in my neighborhood, when one of my neighbors ran down her drive way and told me…

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“Hamadryad” is my word for #WordWednesday. Noun: A tree dwelling nymph (that dies when the tree dies), or a venomous Indian snake,  or a Abyssinian baboon Usage: When the little girl was happy she behaved like “Hamadryad” and when she was angry she behaved like a poisonous king cobra or a famished large monkey. Pronunciation:…

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“Lethologica” and “Lethonomia” are my words for #WordWednesday. Nouns: “Lethologica” is the inability to recall the appropriate word and “Lethonomia” is the inability to recall the appropriate name. Usage: At times, I suffer from “Lethologica” when writing my blog and my husband suffers from “Lethonomia” at large business gatherings. Pronunciation: shorturl.at/vwEKP / lēTHəˈläjəkə and shorturl.at/elFX5…

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The beginning of each school year always evokes copious memories about my childhood, my teaching career, and our sons’ educational experiences from nursery school (that is what it was called in the 1970’s before the description was changed to preschool and/or early learning childhood center) through college, and law school. Now that our grandchildren have…

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“Querimonious” is my word for #WordWednesday. Adjective: Complaining or querulous Usage: My friend became a “Querimonious” woman because of the terrible customer service she experienced. Pronunciation: http://tiny.cc/ysh7az  –  kwerə¦mōnēəs What makes you become a “Querimonious” customer?   My family business memoir, No Bunk, Just BS (Business Sense) is available on Amazon.com. Remember: 10% of royalties from the sale of No Bunk will be…

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For centuries, all over the world, children have grown up listening to or reading fairy tales. These magical, engaging, and imaginary tales teach children and adults meaningful, relevant, and significant life lessons, which help them develop their self-image and how relate to other people, be honest, kind, strong, smart, and understanding of individuals who are…

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“Autodidact” is my word for #WordWednesday. Noun: A self-taught individual, such as Steve Jobs, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Frederick Douglass, Melanie Klein, Leonardo da Vinci, Alexander Hamilton, Mary Everest Boole, Abraham Lincoln, Caroline Herschel, Mark Twain, Melanie Klein, and Bruce Springsteen. Usage: Becoming an expert without any formal training makes you an proficient “Autodidact”.  Pronunciation: http://tiny.cc/fpovaz –  ôdōˈdīdakt…

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“Coruscating” is my word for #WordWednesday. Adjective: 1. flashing, sparkling, shining, bright, brilliant glittering, twinkling, scintillating, flashing, shimmering, 2. Severely critical or scathing Usage: The new manager’s “Coruscating” clothes and verbal attack on staff members surprised everyone in the office. Pronunciation: http://tiny.cc/g1tjaz –  kôrəˌskādiNG/ Do you enjoy wearing “Coruscating” colorful clothes and/or accessories?   My family…

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We often read articles in newspaper and/or online or hear people say we need to teach tolerance to children and adults. In my What Color Is Your Brain?® workshops and programs I teach attendees not to be tolerance! You might be wondering why. The answer is: my What Color Is Your Brain?® approach encourages acceptance,…

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“Exungulating” is my word for #WordWednesday. Verb: To pare off or trim nails or hoofs. Usage: The farrier was “Exungulating” the horse’s hoofs.    Pronunciation: http://tiny.cc/z9h69y –  ʌnjəlādiNG Do you regularly make an appointment with a podiatrist or a manicurist for “Exungulating” your nails?   My family business memoir, No Bunk, Just BS (Business Sense) is available on Amazon.com. Remember: 10% of royalties…

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